Fukushima – WHO is lying

Those jolly chaps at the World Health Organisation have just published a report about the Fukushima disaster…

W.H.O. Sees Low Health Risks From Fukushima Accident – New York Times

What the WHO is saying about Fukushima is almost exactly what they said about Chernobyl; ie, nothing to worry about and the biggest problem is people panicking. Of course the WHO were heavily involved in the somewhat infamous Chernobyl Report, published in 2005 under the umbrella of the United Nations, which stated that 28 people died as a direct result of the Chernobyl disaster, another 15 people later died of thyroid cancer, and up to 4000 will die of cancer in the following decades. A report published in 2009 by the New York Academy of Sciences, called Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment, put the death toll at more than 1 million (you can find the report here – PDF, 4.3 megs). The problem is that many people will be more likely to believe an organisation like the WHO, without knowing how closely linked to the nuclear industry the WHO is. It goes back to a 1959 agreement between the WHO and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which effectively makes the WHO beholden to the IAEA; and of course the IAEA exists to promote nuclear energy. This piece from the Guardian explains it succinctly…

Toxic link: the WHO and the IAEA

Getting back to the WHO’s Fukushima report, what’s there to worry about three reactors in total meltdown, fuel pools catching fire and a large part of northern Japan irradiated for centuries to come – don’t panic; breathe deeply; plutonium is good for you. To give some idea of just how much radiation has been released into the environment (and continues to be released on a daily basis), thyroid cancers started showing-up five years after Chernobyl. With Fukushima, thyroid cancers started appearing one year after the disaster started. Of course, the usual suspects like Greenpeace slammed the report (here) yet even the London Times called it a whitewash for the nuclear industry (here). In 2004, Wladimir Tchertkoff, a Serbian filmmaker, made a documentary about the cosy relationship between the World Health Organisation and nuclear interests. It’s called Nuclear Controversies and is 50 minutes long…

Share
This entry was posted in Politics and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.