About That Hydrogen Bomb…

Since news came through this morning that North Korea had tested another atom bomb – and the North Koreans claimed it to be a hydrogen bomb – I’ve been keeping an eye on the MSM news channels to gauge their reaction. The MSM have wheeled out lots of pundits today to comment on the North Korean nuclear test, but no experts on nuclear weapons; until the BBC News 24 bulletin at 5pm this afternoon, when such an expert was given some air time. This expert – whose name I can’t now remember – used couched language to sort of say that it wasn’t a hydrogen bomb and probably a sophisticated ‘conventional’ atom bomb. Also this afternoon The Guardian have published an ‘explanation’ that uses even more obscurification.

Nuclear bombs that are capable of causing mass destruction come in two flavours of death. Firstly there are fission bombs, which work by splitting atoms (just like nuclear power stations do). Secondly there are fusion bombs (also known as hydrogen bombs or thermo-nuclear bombs) which work by fusing atoms together. A fusion bomb releases much, much more energy than a fission bomb (up to a 1000 times greater energy). The bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were fission bombs. Thus far a fusion bomb has never been used in anger. Thesedays a fission bomb is relatively easy to build. The very difficult bit is getting enough enriched uranium or plutonium for the warhead. This is why the likes of the USA, Russia, China, Britain and France have large scale nuclear power plants, to get the fuel for nukes (without this incentive, nuclear power is a highly dangerous economic white elephant), nukes whose warheads degrade over time and have to be replaced with fresh enriched uranium or plutonium every five to ten years, depending on the type of weapon.

Fusion bombs, on the otherhand, are much more difficult to build. This is because tremendous amounts of heat are required in order to make atoms fuse together and release mega amounts of energy (the sun is one big ball of fusion reactions). To achieve nuclear fusion the Dr Strangeloves first explode a fission bomb, and the heat from it then allows the fusion bomb to explode. Both the fission and fusion bombs are in the same warhead and the process all takes place within fractions of a second; ie, it’s not noticable that there are actually two nuclear explosions. The Strangeloves have also refined the process of mass extermination, whereby after the fission explosion and then the fusion explosion there are further fission explosions, once again all taking place within fractions of a second.

With regard to North Korea, they almost certainly have a small number of fission bombs, but seem to be still struggling to develop a missile that can carry these bombs. As far as fusion bombs go, Pakistan hasn’t yet been able to build one, and neither has India (although there are questions over that), so it seems doubtful that North Korea has the technology to develop such a weapon, let alone to be able to deliver it on a missile; but that won’t stop the Presstitutes from telling you that North Korea has missiles that carry hydrogen bombs.

It’s no wonder that they assassinated President Kennedy…

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