Rocket Man and the Shooting Star

In my previous post, which was about the petrodollar and likely collapse of the American Empire, I gave the opinion that Trump & Co are mad enough to actually start a war with China. One day after I made that post, President Trump gave his first address to the United Nations. Here are some highlights:

The United States has great strength and patience, but if it is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea. Rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime… The Iranian government masks a corrupt dictatorship behind the false guise of a democracy. It has turned a wealthy country, with a rich history and culture, into an economically depleted rogue state whose chief exports are violence, bloodshed, and chaos… My administration recently announced that we will not lift sanctions on the Cuban government until it makes fundamental reforms. We have also imposed tough calibrated sanctions on the socialist Maduro regime in Venezuela, which has brought a once thriving nation to the brink of total collapse… We must protect our nations, their interests and their futures. We must reject threats to sovereignty from the Ukraine to the South China Sea. We must uphold respect for law, respect for borders, and respect for culture, and the peaceful engagement these allow.

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/47838.htm

Most of the UN ambassadors listened to Trump’s speech in stoney silence, because of course the hypocrisy it contained is quite breathtaking. More than that, an American president threatening so many nations has never been seen before at the UN – not least, Trump’s threat to ‘totally destroy’ North Korea; ie, kill more than 20 million people. I believe it was The Saker who described the present US administration as a bunch of five-year-olds on LSD. Even the UN Secretary-General intimated that Trump should have shown more statesmanship with his speech. Trump’s hate-filled speech won’t go down well with Russia and China, two countries that are starting to realise that they are also on the list for ‘regime change’. My biggest worry is that Russia and China won’t wait until they are attacked by America, but instead might launch a pre-emptive strike in the hope of decapitating the American Frankenstein.

It could be argued that in 1945 the German 3rd Reich came to an end and it was superseded by an American 4th Reich. The present appalling state of international relations reminds me of a Tintin book called The Shooting Star. Georges Remi, aka Hergé, drew The Shooting Star in 1942 and it is perhaps the most remarkable of all the wartime Tintin books, and is the first that gives the reader a peek into Hergé’s psyche. The plot of The Shooting Star centres around a giant meteorite that is heading directly for earth, about to bring an end to civilisation. Instead, the meteor veers harmlessly away, leaving behind an earth tremor and a slab of meteorite in the Arctic Ocean. The meteorite slab contains a valuable mineral and two rival expeditions set out to find it. Hergé did not usually go in for symbolism, preferring to score points with humour, but wartime was a special case. The sense of doom in the opening pages of The Shooting Star is palpable, with the frames drawn in stark contrasts of light and shade and the style downbeat. The streets of occupied Brussels convey a menace that leaves little doubt what the approaching meteor is supposed to represent; but Hergé is producing the book under the watchful eye of the Gestapo (during the war Hergé was working for Le Soir, a nazi controlled newspaper) and so the race to find the meteorite slab in the Arctic Ocean becomes a rivalry between a European expedition and an American expedition. The Americans are cast in the role of the bad guys. This perceived anti-Americanism (which can also be found to some extent in The Broken Ear) is one reason why The Adventures of Tintin were never widely published in the USA until recent years (by Little Brown).

Between 1930 and 1976 Hergé completed 23 Tintin books, and they all had a happy ending…

If you are a fan of the Tintin books, or are someone who is curious to know more, you can find my Tintin Pages here.

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