Happy New Year!

A Happy New Year to one and all. It goes without saying that 2019 looks set to be an interesting one, and I mean that in both a good way and a bad way. One example of a good way is the gilets jaunes movement in France. Yes, I know I’ve been banging on about this continuously just recently, so I’ll just add a brief note about it here: I’ve heard many accounts of riot police taking off their helmet and joining the protestors. Last night, New Year’s Eve, the gilets jaunes were out on the streets again; not in great numbers and most of it was peaceful, because people just wanted to see in the New Year. A gilets jaunes demo that was not peaceful took place yesterday evening in Bordeaux. At 9 minutes 25 seconds into this video you can see a riot cop who’s taken off his helmet and leggings and joined in with the protestors (in the video they’ve blurred out the cop’s face to protect his identity). One wonders what happens to these riot police who defect to the gilets jaunes? I would presume they lose their job. Do they also get prosecuted?

Anyhows, stuff like the gilets juanes is why the psychopaths who rule us are quietly rolling out the police state. God, what a world, and hasn’t it always been so…

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10 Responses to Happy New Year!

  1. freddy says:

    happy New Year Rob,
    incredibly warm, here in sunny England, almost too hot.

    French National Rally Party leader Marine Le Pen has lashed out at Emmanuel Macron over his unconciliatory attitude toward those protesting his socio-economic agenda, calling him an “imposter” and a “pyromaniac”

    • Rob Godfrey Rob Godfrey says:

      Freddy, a happy New Year to you, too.

      Here in south west France it’s been very chilly for this time of year. The full blast of winter doesn’t normally arrive until well into January, and into February.

      Both Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon have tried to co-opt the gilets jaunes movement, without any success whatsoever. Most gilets juanes consistantly state that they’ve had enough of the present political system. A key demand is to dissolve the French parliament and set-up a people’s assembly, with direct democracy.

      It’s estimated that 10% or more of the French population have been on the streets these last seven weeks; that 6 million or more people. Who knows where it’s all going to end?!

      • freddy says:

        Rob, as you are from England but long term resident in France, could you explain the apparent difference in belligerence or the ability to stick with demonstrating / protesting.
        The only recent comparison, I can think of
        is Nuclear Armageddon
        the protests around Aldermaston, Burghfield, Greenham Common and Windscale in the 1950’s, 1960’s, 1970’s & 1980’s
        however after forty years that petered out, perhaps because of the fall of the Soviet Union?
        But France, they can go on the streets for months, every year as a mass movement, not about Armageddon but about civic or social concerns.
        I think, since we had our English Revolution, then the return to the Monarchy, we have been more calm than France but France since you had your revolution, you want to seem to keep it going?
        I am not criticising, I think it is fantastic, that you do so well at repeatedly attempting to hold your governments to account.

        Where we do align better, both U.K. and France
        both have governments who wish to plough on with their own agendas, irrespective of the wishes of their own populace.

        • Rob Godfrey Rob Godfrey says:

          Freddy, to a certain extent the French are taught politics and civil society when they are at school. There’s also a big emphasis on philosophy. Even the tabloid newspapers here will publish pieces covering philosophical matters (imagine The Sun doing that!). Then there’s ‘Lunch’, when in the middle of the day just about everything shuts down for 2 or 3 hours (yes, 2 or 3 hours!), and during lunch amongst other things people have the time and space to talk about politics. The UK has nothing in common with these things, and it’s maybe why the French will really go out on the streets and protest?

          Another big difference is the level of violence amongst young people. The sort of scenes you see in UK towns and cities on Friday and Saturday nights is almost unheard of here in France; yet the Brits are docile when it comes to standing up for their rights. Having said that I believe there’s going to be a yellow vest protest in London on 15th January, and rumour has it that it’s going to be a big one. Then there’s Brexit, which maggot May is trying to sabotage. I believe that if there’s not a full Brexit at the end of March there could be widespread civil unrest.

  2. freddy says:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpldvB-zPO8
    Judy the great
    It would seem Macron is really losing it.
    He is embarrassing.
    He must at least begin to understand that he is history.

  3. freddy says:

    “Yellow vests, do not weaken!” Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio, who heads the anti-establishment Five Star Movement (M5S), wrote on his party’s blog, echoed by his counterpart from the far-right League, Matteo Salvini.

    “I support honest citizens protesting against a president who governs against his people,” Salvini said in a statement, while “firmly” condemning recent protest violence.
    https://www.france24.com/en/20190107-italy-france-populist-yellow-vest-silvini-di-maio-protests

    So politicians from Italy are against Macron, the poor boy does not have many supporters left, how much longer can he cling on?

  4. freddy says:

    TWO veteran French conservatives are reportedly leaving the centre-right Les Républicains party to join Marine Le Pen’s extreme-far-right Rassemblement national (RN) movement ahead of 2019 May’s European parliamentary elections, French newspaper Le Figaro reported on Monday.

    Hi Rob, if Emmanuel Macron is still clinging to office by the time the Euro Elections happen, do you think his group will be wiped out?

    • Rob Godfrey Rob Godfrey says:

      Freddy, one reason why I call what’s going on in France at the moment a Revolution is because the gilets jaunes have completely wiped their hands of the present political system. They don’t give a jot about the upcoming European elections. They want to completely get rid of the French parliament and replace it with a People’s Assembly. Bear in mind that we’re not talking about some conspirators in a smokey back room here. The gilets jaunes comprise of millions of people (at least ten million by all accounts) and they have the support of anywhere between 70% and 80% of the French public.

      We had Acte VIII last weekend, which on the Sunday included massive women’s marches in Paris and other cities (the CRS were equally brutal with these women), I believe I mentioned in one of my posts that in the week before Christmas the police cleared most of the gilets jaunes encampments on the roadsides and roundabouts of France. Well, they’re now back again. In my little neck of the woods, yesterday I drove up to the roundabout and there were about twenty gilets jaunes sitting down at a makeshift table; this on a drizzly and cold January afternoon. I mention this to give some indication of the determination of the gilets jaunes.

      Acte IX awaits next weekend, and at the same time there’s going to be the first real yellow jackets protest in London. I wouldn’t be doing it justice to say that we live in interesting times.

      • freddy says:

        Days before France launches a national debate in response to weeks of protests by “gilets jaunes”, the former minister picked to lead the exercise has stepped down.

        Chantal Jouanno resigned amid an outcry over her monthly salary of €14,666 (£13,200; $16,800).

        The protests began in reaction to a fuel tax rise, but then embraced broad anger at the cost of living.

        The big debate on living standards was announced in a series of concessions.

        The timing of Ms Jouanno’s departure is being seen as a massive blow to President Emmanuel Macron
        https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46808667

        I don’t know why Macron does not just throw the towel in, surely it can’t get any grimmer for the twat?

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